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Kathleen Driscoll

Gallery Director

School of Design

(617) 928-4654


M.F.A., Indiana University at Bloomington
B.F.A., Boston University


Art has been part of Professor Driscoll’s life from an early age. “My interest began, mostly because that was the most comfortable place to express myself. Later, I saw it as a powerful tool for expression.”

Professor Driscoll began teaching quite young and found she not only enjoyed it but was good in communicating how students could be free to create.” “I am most interested in having a varied student body with differing skill levels, knowledge and background. The sharing of different ideas in the classroom creates an exciting learning experience for all.”

Professor Driscoll’s career has been wide-ranging. “I have built large-scale sculptures outdoors in exhibitions for museums, galleries, universities and cities. I built one in the state of Washington, for a University in Virginia and the largest piece for the DeCordova Museum and Sculpture Park in Lincoln, Massachusetts.

Professor Driscoll has received grants, one from the Taconic foundation and has taught in Saudi Arabia.

Professor Driscoll teaches Two and Three Dimensional Design and History of Modern and Contemporary Art. In both courses, she says, “I bring my love and understanding of art and design into the classroom to teach students the power of understanding a visual language. In the two and three dimensional design course, I teach how compositions are structured and aid the student in learning how these can be best used to communicate visual ideas through design.”

In the art history course she shares her knowledge of the exciting world of art over time, especially modern and contemporary art that fully inspires and is intertwined in the current trends in all fields of design.

The field of art is never boring. “Art is always evolving. Art is a truly inventive field which has been influencing designers throughout history to take more chances in creating. Art and design are fully intertwined now, so much so, that if you look at any field of design you can see art as the basic core.”

Becoming a successful creative artist is not an easy path, she tells her students, “but to mix a love and knowledge of art with design will make you a more successful designer.”