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James Martin

Professor

Humanities & English
School of Social Sciences & Humanities

Contact
(617) 928-7308
jmartin@mountida.edu

Education

Ph.D., English Literature, Religion, and Theology, Boston University

M.Div., Biblical Literature, Boston University

B.A., English Literature, Colby College

Bio

Professor Martin is passionate about literature.  “For present and future English Majors at Mount Ida I would say that you have chosen one of the best Majors possible both to succeed in a wide range of career opportunities upon graduation and, prior to that, to acquire the necessary foundation to be a persuasive writer and an effective public speaker.”

One of the most interesting things he finds about teaching is “acknowledging that on the first day of classes every September, old ideas about what once worked must be discarded without hesitation in order to learn new ways to make things work that day and going forward.”

During his more than three decades of teaching experience Professor Martin has become a scholar both in and out of the classroom, having authored six books on colleges and universities and how they can best serve their students and faculties.

Those publications, with Johns Hopkins University Press, include The Provost’s Handbook:  The Role of the Chief Academic Officer (2015) and The Sustainable University:  Green Goals and New Challenges for Higher Education Leaders (2012) and Turnaround:  Leading Stressed Colleges and Universities to Excellence (Johns Hopkins, 2009)

His career highlights include a Fulbright Fellowship in London to study mergers within the University of London System and being named the recipient of the Ronald Lettieri Award for Excellence in Teaching at Mount Ida.

Professor Martin is a member of the National Council of Teachers of English and is ordained as an Elder in the United Methodist Church.

He teaches Topics in American Literature:  The Culture and Counterculture of the 1960s, Catastrophes and Disasters:  Breakdowns of our World,  Expository Writing and Introduction to Composition and Literature.