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Ellen J. Goldberger

Professor

History and Interdisciplinary Studies
School of Social Science & Humanities

Contact
(617) 928-7303
ejgoldberger@mountida.edu

Education

J.D., University of San Diego School of Law

M.A., British Literature, Southern Connecticut State University

B.A., Harvard University

Supreme Judicial Court of Massachusetts

Harvard Mediation Program, Harvard Law School

Association for Conflict Resolution

Bio

Professor Ellen J. Goldberger’s background as an attorney and trainer in the Harvard Mediation Program enables her to encourage students to develop practical skills for career success. “I have always loved teaching conflict resolution, law and leadership courses because the subjects are so relevant to the personal and professional lives of my students. The case studies and problems we grapple with in the classroom will hopefully prepare students for creative problem solving in their careers.”

Goldberger feels fortunate to have a job in which she can combine all of her major interests and in which no day is the same as the next. She is constantly learning from and being surprised by her students: “My profession is an example of what we want for all of our students: careers that challenge them and enable them to learn and grow.”

Career highlights for Goldberger include working with a team at the Beth Israel-Deaconess Medical Center on a conflict resolution training manual for astronauts, as part of a larger project titled “Designing a Smart Medical System for Psychosocial Support on Long-Duration Space Flights,” along with teaching awards and publications. Among her achievements, she received Mount Ida’s Ronald J. Lettieri Award for Excellence in Teaching in 2001, and wrote “Designing a First-Year Honors Seminar with a Whole New Mind,” Honors in Practice, Vol. 8, 2012.

Professor Goldberger teaches Conflict and Communication, Mediation Theory and Practice, Introduction to Law, Leadership Studies Seminar and Constitutional Law. In her courses she encourages students “to own the learning process and be their own teachers. There is nothing better than hearing the cross-talk in a classroom, student organization or study group, and watching students educate themselves and each other. That’s the moment when the training wheels come off and you watch them ride away.”